The Use of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring ( ABPM ) in Drug Development

White Paper

The Use of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring ( ABPM ) in Drug Development

This white paper explores: 

  • The limitations of clinic blood pressure measurements
  • What blood pressure is and why we measure it
  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM)
  • The use of ABPM in clinical development
  • Classes of drugs with off-target hypertensive effects
  • Advantages and disadvantages of different blood pressure measurement methods for clinical trials

More about this white paper:

What are the limitations of clinic blood pressure measurements?

Almost everyone has had the experience of having their blood pressure (BP) measured in a doctor’s office. While you sit on an exam table, someone places a BP cuff on your arm, places a stethoscope head (usually cold) against your arm, manually squeezes a little bulb to inflate the BP cuff until it hurts, and then slowly lets the cuff deflate. But the limitations of clinic blood pressure measurements are well documented, and extend both to clinical practice and to clinical trials during drug development.

How can ABPM help?

The availability of ABPM for use in clinical trials overcomes many of the shortcomings of clinic BP measurements, and allows for the precise assessment of the BP effects of new drugs over a full 24 hours, and not just at one or two points following dosing.

The expanded use of ABPM during clinical trials will allow us to much better characterize the small but often persistent BP side effects which may be produced by noncardiac medications. Ultimately, such data will finally allow us to better understand the cardiovascular risks of new medications.

What you’ll learn:

This paper focuses on the increased use of ABPM and its importance in clinical research, including the potential impact of data collected via ABPM. It also examines other blood pressure measurement methods including standard office blood pressure measurement and office electronic blood pressure measurement.



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